South Korea lines up cyber security measures against the North -

South Korea has announced that it will be tightening its cyber security policies in a bid to protect itself from cyberattacks from the North.

However, experts have said the new measures will only be good for lining the pockets of security companies.

According to the Korea Joongang Daily, South Korea is planning to develop a variety of offensive and defensive cyberwarfare weapon, as well as reinforce manpower at the military cyber command, following fears of threats of cyberattacks from North Korea.

A defence plan, which has been presented to President Lee Myung-bak, urges the military to secure intelligence assets and double the number of service personnel at the Cyber Command to 1,000 after increased fears that an attack is imminent.  

The two sides have been locked in disputes for many years and are claimed to be technically at war as the 1950-53 Korean War ended in a truce, not a peace treaty.

However, over the years the cyber threats have become stronger. Earlier this month Seoul accused Pyongyang of interfering with GPS jamming signals on civilian flights and commercial ships operating near the nation's western border. It also pointed the finger claiming it had hacked government websites and banking systems.

Experts, however, have said these claims are more "paranoia" rather than a threat.

One told TechEye: "This level of paranoia is great for security companies but not so good for the governments at war with each other. While it's no secret that South and North Korea don't get along, accusations of interfering with GPS jamming signals on civilian flights and commercial ships is moving into tin hat territory.

"I can accept the website hacking as this is common for warring Asian countries, but the GPS claims are a little bit extreme.

"The fact that South Korea is now claiming it will develop a variety of offensive and defensive cyberwarfare weapons and reinforce manpower at the military cyber command is nothing new as many countries are doing this, but the question is, will they be spending money on nothing?

"After all, the only real way to secure these operations is to hire underground hackers who will have also been employed in the North instead of throwing money at security companies who can't offer the true protection they need".