Porn Industry goes on the attack -

THE porn industry is fighting against P2P file sharers in a mass lawsuit campaign.

In two weeks one lawyer with an AOL e-mail address, working out of a Martinsburg, West Virginia office, has managed to file more than 16,700 new lawsuits against P2P file-sharers.

According to Ars Technica, Kenneth Ford is at the forefront of an increasingly litigious porn industry.

He set up the Adult Copyright Company and filed several lawsuits during the summer for films like Juicy White Anal Booty 4.

But in recent weeks he really has been working flat out. Last month he sued 7,098 anonymous online P2P users for sharing the film Batman XXX: A Porn Parody. He pulled 7,098 IP addresses as proof of ID. Once he has that he sends out a threatening letter demanding money.

If they don't pay up then Ford his them with a message with lots of capital letters.

"THE MORE EFFORT WE EXPEND, INCLUDING NAMING YOU INDIVIDUALLY IN A LAWSUIT, THE MORE WE MUST RECOVER TO MAKE OUR CLIENT WHOLE."

If it does go to trail then infringers are going to be charged $150,000 for each file.

Last week he initiated a similar campaign against 9,729 people who were sharing a flick called Teen Anal Nightmare 2.

One lawyer taking on 17,000 people in under two weeks is more than the RIAA managed in five years.

The US Copyright Group, which helped to develop the for-profit P2P litigation model in the US has only sued around 16,000 people so far.

Recently, the porn industry announced its plan to "significantly reduce digital piracy of adult content and to effectively drive those who engage in adult content piracy completely underground by January 2012.

It is not clear how much cash he collects. Certainly no one has gone to trial yet to prove its success. The "business model" is similar to one being tried by ACS LAW in the UK which is surrounded in controversy.

However, if this is the strategy being employed by the porn industry it could be the most vicious attack on file sharing pirates ever. Of course it relies on them not to band together and issue any counter attack. Unfortunately for them legal defences against piracy have not been very effective once a case gets to court.