Aussie secret service building blueprints hacked -

Blueprints for Aussie Secret Service's new $631 million building have been pinched by a Chinese hacker.

The move could mean that when Chinese agents infiltrate the new building they will know where the toilets and canteen are, something which is a state secret to most Aussies.

According ABC's Four Corners, the blueprints included floor plans and the locations of communications cabling, servers and security systems.

It is the latest in a series of scandals over the building, which has been plagued by delays and budget blowouts. Costs have so far blown out by $171 million and it will not open until the latter half of this year.

Apparently the hackers hit a contractor involved with building the new headquarters. The attack was traced to a server in China.

China has been busy Down Under. So far hackers have visited the prime minister's office and cabinet, defence, tourism and foreign affairs and trade.

The home of Australia's overseas intelligence agency ASIS has also been hacked.

The cyber attack targeting the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade reportedly involved the theft of a document that was so sensitive that if you looked at it in a funny way it required counselling.

Hackers have also accessed classified emails on the Defence Department's restricted network.

It seems that the hackers are closely monitoring employees too. One sent a highly classified document from his desk computer to his home email account. The home account was hacked and the document to be sent to China.

All this hackage is making the Aussies think that there needs to be a mandatory disclosure law where spooks and governments put their hands up when they have been hacked.

Four Corners also reported that Codan, a defence contractor based in Adelaide that designs and builds communications equipment for radio, satellite and metal detection applications, had also been targeted.

Australian PM Julia Gillard has responded to the the allegations of cyber-hacking made by saying the ABC's Four Corners program were 'inaccurate'. We are not sure if it was because ABC spelt a word wrong, or stuck an apostrophe in the wrong place.