Superconductors run better on red wine -

Last year researchers discovered that red wine can turn certain materials into superconductors. At the time they didn't know why, or which red wine worked the best.

Now they have discovered after much testing that Beaujolais creates the best superconductor and they know why.

Keita Deguchi at the National Institute for Materials Science in Tsukuba, Japan thinks that the mystery ingredient is tartaric acid which reacts with iron telluride.

The iron does not superconduct unless some of the telluride atoms are replaced with sulphur, forming FeTeS. This does not superconduct unless it goes through heating with water.

Water works well but whiskey, shochu and beer were better. Red wine is the best of the lot.

The best performer was an unassuming wine made from the gamay grape. If you can find a 2009 Beajoulais from the Paul Beaudet winery in central France you have the best juice for a superconductor.

When looking at the wine they found that the Beaujolais has the highest tartaric acid concentration so they repeated the experiment using a mixture of water and tartaric acid to find out how well it performed. It performed better than water alone but not as well as the Beaujolais.

They think that tartaric acid is clearly part of the answer, but there must be another component of red wine that somehow encourages the transition to a superconducting state.  It is fairly clear that you can't palm off any Happy Shopper red onto a superconductor, it can spot the difference.