Apple stays quiet on iPhone 5C sales -

Apple has been behaving unusually, this time staying quiet on how many iPhone 5Cs it pre-sold during the toy's first 24 hours on the market.

The company has trumpeted its success for every iPhone since 2009 and uses the figures to drum up hype about it selling shedloads - so potential customers had better get their orders in quick.

This time, iPhone 5C sales may not be up to snuff.

The dark satanic rumour mill suggests that Apple has racked up 1 million iPhone 5C preorders. While this is not to be sneezed at, it is half the 2 million presales scored by the iPhone 5 on its first day of ordering availability last year.

According to Slashdotto make matters worse, Apple hasn't made its other new smartphone, the high-end iPhone 5S, available for pre-order.

One theory is that Apple wants to post pre-order numbers for the iPhone 5C and 5S together so that the numbers look bigger.

If that is the case it will have to wait until after the iPhone 5S releases on 20 September.

But it seems that the Apple's online storefront hasn't sold out of the iPhone 5C, which suggests demand is not quite as high as in previous years.

All this is calling into question Apple's decision to launch two iPhones rather than just one.

There are dark mutterings in the analyst market about cannibalism. Users who would've bought the iPhone 5S are tempted into buying the cheaper option and eating other users while queuing up to buy it.

Cannibalism was what killed the iPod and now it seems Apple has replicated the experiment on the iPhone.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said that cannibalisation is a good thing, so long as it's Apple products eating other Apples.

But the iPhone 5C is a low-margin device and if there is any cannibalisation it will be of the higher-margin iPhone 5S. The only way for Apple to fix that problem is if 5C sales are driven by new customers.

To make matters worse for Apple, the iPhone 5C is too expensive. The 5C costs $550 unsubsidised and that is far too high for the lower-midrange market.