Apple insists on distorting reality -

Jobs' Mob is finding that it is increasingly difficult to use its reality distortion field against real world targets, such as cops and anti-trust watchdogs.

In Australia, it found itself in hotwater with an advertising watchdog. Basically it had been caught telling Australians that the new iPad could use 4G when it couldn't.

Nothing wrong with that. All Apple had to do was admit it was wrong, pay a fine, go back to making the shiny toys which makes it lots of dosh. After people like me get bored with reminding them that they are really snake oil sellers, there is nothing to worry about.

But Apple can't do that. To admit that it lied on an advertisement appears too much for the outfit. According to the Sydney Morning Herald,  attempts to broker a deal with Apple and Australia's competition watchdog has ended without a resolution.

Apple's response to its advertising SNAFU was to first pretend that Australia's Competition and Consumer Commission did not even exist.

When the ACCC took the outfit to court, Apple finally agreed that it would put a notice up wherever the new iPad was sold, warning customers that while it does work at fast speeds, it is not compatible with any Australian 4G networks.

Apple also agreed to contact all customers and advise them the tablet did not work on Australian 4G networks and offer refunds.

But the problem is the name of the gadget, which still calls itself a 4G tablet. Apple simply can't have the name on the tablet changed, even though it has admitted that it is a lie.

A mediation session scheduled concluded two hours after it started, with Apple refusing to change the name.

Part of the problem appears to be religious. Steve Jobs set out a road map of products five years into the future after his death. Apple has this roadmap carved in the forehead of Tim Cook and it must be stuck to, at all costs.

Jobs' Mob is down for a 4G version of the tablet so the tablet in the shops must be a 4G machine, even if it isn't.

The problem is that any antitrust watchdog, which does not have to accept the dogma of Steve Jobs' roadmap, is just going to be more and more arsy about it. It seems that Apple is not going to trade down its sacred roadmap and may have to withdraw the tablet from the Aussie market to preserve it.