Manufacturers don't want Microsoft's tablet -

The dark satanic rumour mill has manufactured a hell on earth yarn that manufacturers are not interested in Microsoft CEO's Steve Ballmer's new vision for a tablet.

After going out unto the desert for 40 days and 40 nights, and feasting entirely on locusts, Ballmer came back with a vision of an Intel Atom-based tablets running Microsoft's Windows operating system in an iPad.

However manufacturers think that Steve might have skimped on the locusts and dined on mushrooms instead.

Chatting off the record to Ubergizmo  in the style of Digitimes, the manufacturers say that after the iPad they are working out how to make a tablet that lasts longer with better battery efficiency.

They are mostly interestedin ARM-based and Android.  But hang on aren't these manufacturers also showing off tablet offerings running Intel's revised Atom CPU, called Oak Trail, at the Intel Developer Forum in September?

Apparently that is because they feel  pressured into releasing Intel and Windows tablets to maintain and preserve their relationships with the two tech giants.

One very thirsty manufacturer said that vendors will  launch Atom-and-Windows-based models in small volumes to maintain their relationships with Intel and Microsoft, and also to gauge market demand.

Apparently they fear that if they do not appease the two giants Intel will not give them access to more popular chips, like the Core i7.  So they fear more the wrath of Intel and not that of Steve and his Microsoft machine.

Actually everyone is only guessing that Oak Trail models that will be shown at the Intel Developer Forum next month will be production samples or if they will ever make it to consumer's hands.

Oak Trail, unlike previous Atom-based chips, promises 50 per cent  more power efficiency when playing full high definition videos and can support the MeeGo, Windows, and Android operating systems.

Intel claims it is seeing more adoption: from the industry adoption for the Atom platform optimized for tablets and sleeker netbook form factors.

 

 

Manufacturers don't want Microsoft's tablet

But are two scared to admit it to Intel

 

The dark satanic rumour mill has manufactured a hell on earth yarn that manufacturers are not interested in Microsoft CEO's Steve Ballmer's new vision for a tablet.

After going out unto the desert for 40 days and 40 nights, and feasting entirely on locusts, Ballmer came back with a vision of an Intel Atom-based tablets running Microsoft's Windows operating system in an iPad.

However manufacturers think that Steve might have skimped on the locusts and dined on mushrooms instead.

Chatting off the record to Ubergizmo http://www.ubergizmo.com/15/archives/2010/08/manufacturers_reluctant_to_make_intel_windows_tablets.html in the style of Digitimes, the manufactures say that after the iPad they are working out how to make a tablet that lasts longer with better battery efficiency.

They are mostly interestedin ARM-based and Android. But hang on aren't these manufacturers also showing off tablet offerings running Intel's revised Atom CPU, called Oak Trail, at the Intel Developer Forum in September?

Apparently that is because they feel pressured into releasing Intel and Windows tablets to maintain and preserve their relationships with the two tech giants.

One very thirsty manufacturer said that vendors will launch Atom-and-Windows-based models in small volumes to maintain their relationships with Intel and Microsoft, and also to gauge market demand.

Apparently they fear that if they do not appease the two giants Intel will not give them access to more popular chips, like the Core i7. So they fear more the wrath of Intel and not that of Steve and his Microsoft machine.

Actually everyone is only guess that Oak Trail models that will be shown at the Intel Developer Forum next month will be production samples or if they will ever make it to consumer's hands.

Oak Trail, unlike previous Atom-based chips, promises 50 per cent more power efficiency when playing full high definition videos and can support the MeeGo, Windows, and Android operating systems.

Intel claims it is seeing more adoption: from the industry adoption for the Atom platform optimized for tablets and sleeker netbook form factors.