Market research company DRAM Exchange said that every time Apple introduces a product, it imposes capacity crunches in the overall marketplace.

That's because, according to its figures, Apple controls over 20 percent of the NAND Flash market. And if it sells 1.5 million units in the first half of this year, that in itself will mean the iPad will eat up an additional two percent of NAND demand in 2010.

The market research company already estimates that there will be a shortage of NAND in the second half of this year, and that can only mean one thing.

Prices will rise. So what's an ill wind for customers of memory manufacturers, is a silver lining for the memory makers.

Other companies that buy NAND include a whole host of manufacturers that may or may not compete with Apple. But with Apple holding that 20 percent position, it must be in a very good position to demand supplies when the memory goes on allocation.