Rock the Linux kernel module -

A popular beat combo from the town which bought us Nirvana has released a debut album as a Linux kernel module alongside the usual formats.

Netcat, which shares its name with a networking tool of the same name, told the world+dog on its Facebook page that the world was ready for Linux kernel module music.

"Are you ever listening to an album, and thinking 'man, this sounds good, but I wish it crossed from user-space to kernel-space more often!' We got you covered. Our album is now fully playable as a loadable Linux kernel module."

The album has the catchy title Cycles Per Instruction and the kernel module can be found on GitHub.

Reddit users are enthusiastic and some of them are planning to port it to a specialized raspberry pi image and build a strange dedicated Walkman to play it.

Oddly the band are also releasing it on cassette and we are surprised there are any of those still around.

Needless to say having music as code is always going to find an open sauce pedants who are going to complain. One moaned about the unnecessary intermediate compression of the audio, others who played it just think it sounds like shit.

We would have thought that it would have been better to have used Flanders and Swan as a test for it – a song like "I'm a Gnu... how do you do".

What is strange is that while many bands pitch at the teenage girl market, Netcat appears to have thought that Linux programmers were a better bet.

Their website said that the group wanted to explore the intersection between "technology, complexity, and free improvisation." This means bringing together conventional instruments and combining it with computer generated sounds and computer instruments, like the Chango, a novel synthesizer that is played with light.

It case you were wondering, the mixture of these ingredients is "textural, long-form structured improvisations" which requires you to "laying down on the floor with expensive headphones on and enjoying the solipsism".

We are guessing that solipsism is not just a euphemism for being under the influence of hash... er the hash key.