Microsoft cloud job claim is total PR drivel - Wikimedia

It has been suggested that Microsoft and IDC may well and truly have their heads in the clouds 
Analysts have rubbished a report from the pair which suggested that instead of taking jobs away, cloud computing will actually increase IT jobs.  

One analyst from a well known firm told TechEye the research could "give false light at the end of the tunnel."

Yesterday Microsoft and IDC claimed that computing projects have contributed to $400 billion in new revenue and 1.5 million new jobs over the past 12 months. The research predicted that IT cloud services would generate nearly 14 million jobs worldwide by 2015.

However, IT World pointed out that most of these jobs will be in business functions and not IT, meaning that those in this industry may still find themselves on the dole queue. It pointed to a 2011 report by Gartner, which suggested that cloud computing would not support a human IT workforce, but replace it.  

IT World also pointed out that the predicted 14 million jobs created by this technology would only be beneficial in small to medium sized businesses serving the banking, communications and manufacturing industries. 

In fact, the US is likely to suffer, as many of these jobs will go to countries like China and India where labour is cheaper, despite the original report stating that America was a big spender in the cloud computing market.  

An analyst for the cloud computer sector echoed these thoughts, telling TechEye: "The developing countries will emerge strongly when it comes to IT jobs. There's a huge cloud buzz in India - where R&D factories are being set up and jobs are plenty, but developed countries such as the US are more likely to see work levels drop as manual workers are replaced by machines.

"It's not a new concept, it's just the way it goes.

"To suggest that cloud computing is the 'miracle' solution is irresponsible. It gives false light at the end of the tunnel.

"If I may be so bold to say, it looks like the report is a bit of a sales tool by one of the parties involved," he added.